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MedSights

Hormone Treatment in Early Post-Menopausal Phase Prevents Heart Disease in Women

Hormone Treatment in Early Post-Menopausal Phase Prevents Heart Disease in Women

"Women undertaking hormonal therapy during their early post-menopausal phase tend to carry lesser rate of subclinical atherosclerosis", say researchers from the University of Southern California, US. The study results were published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Subclinical atherosclerosis forms the fundamental mechanism in development of cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack, stroke, etc. Several studies have noted that the perks of hormone therapy against vascular degeneration
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Birth Control Pills Protect Women Against Serious Knee Injuries

Birth Control Pills Protect Women Against Serious Knee Injuries

Women consuming birth control pills experience lesser incidence of knee injuries, stated Aaron Gray, lead author of a study performed at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is one of the most common injuries experienced by athletes. The ACL connects the top and bottom parts of the knee. Serious injury may happen if the ligament is damaged with back-to-play rat
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How Preclinical Gene Models Push Advance Anti Diabetic Research?

How Preclinical Gene Models Push Advance Anti Diabetic Research?

Ants always eat sweet food but none of them haven't diabetes?- This could be the longing and despondent statement of any of the more than 300 million individuals worldwide affected by diabetes. Diabetes is debatably the most critical health care concern that has ignited a global crisis on the fiscal and physical status of all nations of the world. With its intricate association with obesity, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, cancers, Kidney and Eye disease, Stroke, Alzheimer?s disease and
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Curbing Vitamin D Levels Pose the Liability of Heart Disease

Curbing Vitamin D Levels Pose the Liability of Heart Disease

An exclusive study from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City proposes that curtailed concentrations of vitamin D may anticipate the risk of cardiovascular conflicts such as heart attack, heart failure, stroke or death in people. Headed by author Heidi May, the study assessed 4200 elderly people aged between 52-76 years. Among them, 30% were diabetic while 70% suffered coronary artery disease. The authors analysed the levels of various vitamin D metabolites in eac
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Recipients Attain Survival Boon from Mismatched Alive Donor Kidney Transplant

Recipients Attain Survival Boon from Mismatched Alive Donor Kidney Transplant

“Transplanting kidney from HLA-incompatible alive donors may exhibit consequential survival benefit than receiving kidney from a deceased donor or not at all” says Dorry Segev, in a study published in the recent issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The long-term study included 22 transplant centers and analyzed survival rates of 1,025 kidney transplant recipients from HLA-incompatible alive donors, 5,125 patients who are on waiting list or received kidney from a deceased donor, a
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COPD Exacerbations - Beta Blockers May Be a Favorable Option

COPD Exacerbations – Beta Blockers May Be a Favorable Option

High blood pressure and angina have been the standard indications for opting beta-blockers until in a current study presented at the European Respiratory Society's Lung Science Conference; Lies Lahousse reported that beta-blockers may prove to be beneficial in diminishing the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations. In exacerbations, a COPD patient suffers from increased breathlessness. Although it is likely that beta-blockers may create breathing problems by constrict
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Omega-3 Fatty Acids Safeguard against Risk of Breast Cancer in Obese Postmenopausal Women

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Safeguard against Risk of Breast Cancer in Obese Postmenopausal Women

One of the major and common diseases that endanger postmenopausal women is breast cancer. Obesity is the prominent risk factor indicated in breast cancer to date. It’s believed that obese women have elevated inflammation due to which they are prone to breast cancer. A recent two-year study in Cancer Prevention Research demonstrated that omega-3 fatty acids with its anti-inflammatory effects may prove to be a valuable tool to reduce the risk of breast cancer in obese postmenopausal women. In
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More Water Intake Curtails Sugar, Salt and Fat Consumption

More Water Intake Curtails Sugar, Salt and Fat Consumption

Water is a fundamental component since 70% of the body comprises of water. In a recent study issued in the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Prof.Ruopeng An, stated that increasing plain water consumption results in excellent weight management and reduces intake of sugar, salt and fat. The investigators acquired a nationally representative sample from approximately 18,300 adults in the US from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2005-2012. The participants w
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Gene Mutation Downturns Heart Attack Risk

Gene Mutation Downturns Heart Attack Risk

When it’s about cholesterol, LDL cholesterol manifests as the prime risk factor in coronary artery disease (CAD). However, a recent study headed by Heribert Schunkert reported that the energy stores of the body—triglycerides—are the next harmful variants after LDL; and discovered that people having a particular gene mutation caused significant decrement in triglyceride levels thereby reducing the risk of heart attack by 50%. The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, a
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SSRIs Use and Longer Umbilical Cords: A New Threat in Pregnancy

SSRIs Use and Longer Umbilical Cords: A New Threat in Pregnancy

A recent study published in the journal PLoS ONE has unveiled that Women who used selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy were more likely to give birth to newborns with longer umbilical cords. The researchers noted that longer umbilical cord may reduce fetal circulation, wrap around the fetus’s neck, or cause problems in later pregnancy and labor. Hitherto, mothers’ use of SSRI antidepressants has been associated with lower Apgar scores and birth weight of newborns,
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